by Emily Mancini

For Douglas Corwin, president of Crescent Duck Farm in Aquebogue, he reveres the fact that raising high-quality ducks is a time-honored Long Island tradition.

Crescent Duck Farm was founded in 1908, when Henry Corwin purchased 30 ducks to raise on land that had been in the family since it was first settled around 1640.

Five generations later, Crescent Duck Farm raises over a million ducks a year, supplying about 4 percent of the nation’s total. It’s also the only duck farm left on Long Island.

“I feel an awful lot of pride for what we do,” said Corwin. “We’re upholding a Long Island tradition. There used to be almost a hundred duck farms on Long Island and now we’re the only one left.

“And while 4 percent of the nation’s supply isn’t a lot compared to some of our competitors,” he continued, “we breed our ducks to be much more desirable, with a thicker breast meat layer that cooks up moist and succulent.”

And Crescent Duck Farm remains a family business.

Corwin’s sons Blake and Pierce returned from Cobleskill and Cornell Universities in 2005, committed to taking Crescent Farms forward.

“Each new generation brings new ideas to build on what we have,” Corwin said. “And once you try one of our well-prepared duck, you’ll never want to try anything else.”

Island to Table-goers in Patchogue on July 30 will be able to experience the results of Crescent Farms’ enduring legacy, which continues to have the highest-end restaurateurs across the country clamoring for more.

Chef Radu Grigore of Toro Tapas & Tequila will be preparing an entree of duck liver marinated in cognac and amaretto and served in a sweet sherry compote. That Meetball Place’s Bernie Menendez is using Crescent Duck for a his duck meatballs.

Tickets for the Island to Table fundraiser are $150 each (available below) for the six-course meal. Each course will be paired with a local beer or wine.

The event raises money for the local HomeGrown Change nonprofit group.

Photo courtesy of Crescent Duck Farm